The reasons Black women suffer disproportionately from abuse are complex. Racism and sexism are two of the biggest obstacles that Black women in America face. But because many Black women and men believe racism is a bigger issue than sexism, Black women tend to feel obligated to put racial issues ahead of sex-based issues. For Black women, a strong sense of cultural affinity and loyalty to community and race renders many of us silent, so our stories often go untold. One of the biggest related impediments is our hesitation in trusting the police or the justice system. As Black people, we don’t always feel comfortable surrendering “our own” to the treatment of a racially biased police state and as women, we don’t always feel safe calling police officers who may harm us instead of helping us. And when we do speak out or seek help, we too often experience backlash from members of our communities who believe we are airing out dirty laundry and making ourselves look bad in front of White people.

Access to employment and economic self-sufficiency are also important. Racism has a disparate impact on Black people, men especially, who have, for the past six decades, consistently been held to an unemployment rate almost double that of white men. In a society that measures “manhood” primarily by one’s ability to provide, being denied access to the means to provide can cause some men to seek power through dominating women. For some men, the venting of anger turns violent and their partners suffer the greatest blows. Black women also face employment disparities, earning less than Black men and White men and women. This wage disparity limits available options and leaves many women, particularly mothers, feeling trapped in bad relationships where financial needs trump all.

-from, 

Why Black Women Struggle More With Domestic Violence

(via diasporadash)

The reasons Black women suffer disproportionately from abuse are complex. Racism and sexism are two of the biggest obstacles that Black women in America face. But because many Black women and men believe racism is a bigger issue than sexism, Black women tend to feel obligated to put racial issues ahead of sex-based issues. For Black women, a strong sense of cultural affinity and loyalty to community and race renders many of us silent, so our stories often go untold. One of the biggest related impediments is our hesitation in trusting the police or the justice system. As Black people, we don’t always feel comfortable surrendering “our own” to the treatment of a racially biased police state and as women, we don’t always feel safe calling police officers who may harm us instead of helping us. And when we do speak out or seek help, we too often experience backlash from members of our communities who believe we are airing out dirty laundry and making ourselves look bad in front of White people.

Access to employment and economic self-sufficiency are also important. Racism has a disparate impact on Black people, men especially, who have, for the past six decades, consistently been held to an unemployment rate almost double that of white men. In a society that measures “manhood” primarily by one’s ability to provide, being denied access to the means to provide can cause some men to seek power through dominating women. For some men, the venting of anger turns violent and their partners suffer the greatest blows. Black women also face employment disparities, earning less than Black men and White men and women. This wage disparity limits available options and leaves many women, particularly mothers, feeling trapped in bad relationships where financial needs trump all.

-from, 

Why Black Women Struggle More With Domestic Violence

(via diasporadash)

notime4yourshit:

Dominique Christina - Karma

We become poets in an attempt to tether words to righteousness
Our notebooks to social consciousness
Sitting cross-legged and anxious in wing back chairs
We sip lattes to news of regimes, firing American artillery into crowds of folk

Their bodies pickled by the sun, they line streets & countries we never think about
And we suck our teeth and ask a thesaurus to become a machete
And as romantic as pacifism is
These days I dream of dictators falling head first into karma & forget to be afraid

If I could write this shit in fire, I would write this shit in fire
This aint poetry, it’s rage unmuted, a verb, a means, an end
This is my body, this is a sacrifice, this is an offering, this is Sankofa and Amandla
South Side Chicago and Compton California, Redhook Projects in Jersey, Roosevelt Projects in Brooklyn

This is severed hands, clubs against flesh
Black boots to pregnant bellies
This is sterilizations, inoculations, leg irons and chains
The bit, the noose, this is a war-cry

Tell Massa I’m coming back, carrying fire in my knapsack
Tell him, I am Patrice Lumumba, Steven Biko, Fred Hampton, Fannie Lou Hamer
Tell him, They have been born again in me
Tell him, I found my mother tongue buried under the rubble of the World Trade Center

Tell him, This shit aint no poem
This is me, running naked from sugarcane & cotton fields having dropped my croker sack
Tell him, He can call me Karma
I am refleshing the bones, a witch, a root worker, a sorceress, a priestess, a gangster

Tell him, This is the result of segregation
Tell him, This is the result of integration
Tell him, I have never been invisible
Tell him, He has never been invincible

Tell him, I’m gone melt the barbed wire and steel bars of prison yards, they gone flow over him like lava
I am returned, I am blood thirsty, I am fangs & hooks, and swollen feet in welfare lines
The gauntlet thrown down, lines drawn in the sand
I am apocryphal, historical deletions gathering themselves up and into textbooks

I am the niece of exploitation, on a rice and pancake box
Come to collect the royalties for Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben
I am a line of smoke, a rain dance, the Tomahawk used to kill the first invader
The streets of Benghazi pocked in prayer beads and shell casings, the juxtaposition of faith and savagery

Tell him, I’m African wide hips and American bulimia
Peace symbols affixed onto assault rifles
It is the deepest kind of contradiction
If I could write this shit in fire, I would write this shit in fire

Tell Massa, I’m coming back
Howl in the wind, I’m coming back
Burr in your heel, I’m coming back
I’m coming back Massa, I’m coming back Massa

I’m coming back

If we viewed victims as more than a link to be tweeted, more than statistics to be reported to a broken criminal justice system, we would have to grapple with their complex humanity. We would have to offer meaningful solutions to violence, holistic responses to trauma, and accountability for abusers whom we may love. We would have to do more than just watch.
Hannah Giorgis (ethiopienne), “Don’t watch the Ray Rice video. Don’t ask why Janay Palmer married him. Ask why anyone would blame a victim” (x)

(via ethiopienne)

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

(via tariqk)

plannedparenthood:

Life happens. So if you’ve experienced any changes lately  like you got married or celebrated your 26th birthday  you may not have to wait until the next Obamacare enrollment period to get health insurance. Check out this flowchart from Families USA and see where you stand.

And if Michael Brown was not angelic, I was practically demonic. I had my first drink when I was 11. I once brawled in the cafeteria after getting hit in the head with a steel trash can. In my junior year I failed five out of seven classes. By the time I graduated from high school, I had been arrested for assaulting a teacher and been kicked out of school (twice.) And yet no one who knew me thought I had the least bit of thug in me. That is because I also read a lot of books, loved my Commodore 64, and ghostwrote love notes for my friends. In other words, I was a human being. A large number of American teenagers live exactly like Michael Brown. Very few of them are shot in the head and left to bake on the pavement.

The “angelic” standard was not one created by the reporter. It was created by a society that cannot face itself, and thus must employ a dubious “morality” to hide its sins. It is reinforced by people who have embraced the notion of “twice as good” while avoiding the circumstances which gave that notion birth. Consider how easily living in a community “with rough patches” becomes part of a list of ostensible sins. Consider how easily “black-on-black crime” becomes not a marker of a shameful legacy of segregation but a moral failing.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, being amazing. (via politicalprof)

(via becauseiamawoman)

I will always be on the side of those who have nothing and who are not even allowed to enjoy the nothing they have in peace.
Federico García Lorca. (via jose-corderoarauz)

(via macaronicone)

Never forget
When your classmates wrinkled their noses at the scent of your lunch still lingering on your clothes,
Even though their ancestors had conquered half the world in search of the spices you ate.

Never forget
How they jeered at your mother’s bindi, making crude jokes about how ridiculous it looked on her,
And after ten years, how they all wore the exact same ornament on their own foreheads to keep up with the current trends.

Never forget
When they repeatedly stumbled over the sharp letters which formed your name, forcing you to repeat yourself several times before giving up;
Only to have those very letters tattooed on their own flesh, in a language they do not comprehend.

Always remember
Your culture belongs to you,
Not to them.

Muneeb Hasan [08.10.14] (via muneebb)

(via cielito-lindo)

[trigger warning: suicide]

If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)

THISSSS!!!!

(via thisisglorious)

YES 

(via fromonesurvivortoanother)

(via note-a-bear)

We alone can devalue gold
by not caring
if it falls or rises
in the marketplace.
Wherever there is gold
there is a chain, you know,
and if your chain
is gold
so much the worse
for you.

Feathers, shells
and sea-shaped stones
are all as rare.

This could be our revolution:
to love what is plentiful
as much as
what’s scarce.

alice walker, we alone. (via ethiopienne)

(via ethiopienne)

Have more than you show,
Speak less than you know
King Lear: Act 1, Scene 4 - William Shakespeare (via creatingaquietmind)

(via creatingaquietmind)

sixpenceee:

Another way to present the 9 types of intelligence as exemplified by my How Do We Measure Intelligence post.

The basic idea is that different people are good at different things. These 9 probably don’t cover the wide range of smarts we all possess, but it’s a start.

As Albert Einstein said, ”Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

(via bellahugo)